Venus de Milo Statue by Alexandros of Antioch

Venus de Milo Statue
Venus de Milo Statue

Alexandros of Antioch’s Venus de Milo Statue

They named the statue Venus de Milo after Aphrodite’s Roman name, Venus, and the Greek island of Milos, where it was discovered. The Venus de Milo is an armless marble statue of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty, and one of the most famous specimens of sculpture from Ancient Greece. Its thought it to be the work of the sculptor Alexandros of Antioch.

When I stood before the statue, it seemed to me to be a lot larger than life. They positioned it in the middle of one of the long hallways. If it was not for the crowd gathered around the statue, you may just walk on by. To me, it seemed to be out of place in the middle of a hallway. But the good thing is you could freely walk all around the statue.

Alexandros Of Antioch

In the beginning it was attributed to sculptor Praxiteles but, based on a inscription placed on his base, it is now thought to be Alexandro of Antioch’s work. The Venus de Milo is an old Greek statue, one of the most famous works of an ancient Greek sculpture.

Venus de Milo

Created between 130 and 100 BC, the sculpture is believed to represent Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty. Some historians, however, argue that she is the goddess of the sea, Amphitrite, venerated by Milos.

When I visited the Louver I was surprised that the marble statue, slightly larger than the life size at a height of 203 cm (6ft 8 in). And something I did not know was after the discovery of the statue, part of the arm and the original plinth were lost.

As most of us know now it is currently on permanent display at the Louver Museum in Paris. The statue was named after the Roman name of Aphrodite, Venus, and the Greek island of Milos, where it was found.

It is commonly believed that the Venus de Milo was found on 8 April 1820 by a peasant called Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a hidden niche in the ruins of the ancient town of Milos. Milos is the present village of Trypiti, on the island of Milos (also called Melos or Milo) in the Aegean, which was then part of the Ottoman Empire.

The Venus de Milo was marketed by the Louvre as a masterwork from the Greek classical period. The Venus de Milo, on the other hand, is currently assumed to have been created around 100 B.C., during the Hellenistic period. The statue, which was originally carved in two blocks of marble and then joined together, stands 6 feet 7 inches tall from head to toe and was created by an unknown craftsman named Alexandros of Antioch.

What Did Venus De Milo Look Like Originally?

Venus de Milo was depicted with her left hand grazing the shoulder of a warrior, such as Mars or Theseus. She was often depicted holding a mirror, an apple, or laurel wreaths, and her left arm was supported on a pedestal. She was even shown as a mother with a baby in her arms.

The Venus de Milo was marketed by the Louvre as a masterwork from the Greek classical period. The Venus de Milo, on the other hand, is currently assumed to have been created around 100 B.C., during the Hellenistic period. The statue, which was originally carved in two blocks of marble and then joined together, stands 6 feet 7 inches tall from head to toe and was created by an unknown craftsman named Alexandros of Antioch.

What Is The Value Of The Venus De Milo?

The discovery sparked frenzied discussions between French officials and the island’s Greek authorities, who eventually agreed to a payment of 1,000 francs, nearly the cost of a good herd of goats in those days.

If only you could get into a time machine and go back in time and order a couple more, right? Or maybe have Venus’s sister commissioned. Venus has a big sister. Before the Venus de Milo emerged on the scene, the Venus of Arles had personified ideal classical beauty. She was also given the name of the location where she was discovered, in this case the Roman theater of Arles in southern France in 1651, during Louis XIV’s reign.

Who Paid Venus De Milo?

Finally after discussions the matter was addressed. After two days of disputes and talks, and Yorgos (the farmer) received his cash. The Venus de Milo was sailed to France, where it was presented to King Louis XVIII, who donated it to the Louvre where is stands today.

Venus de Milo Influence

The sculpture has greatly influenced the masters of modern art; “Salvador Dalí’s Venus de Milo with the drawers” is a prime example. And I find this to be most interesting it’s formerly part of the seal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), one of the oldest organizations of plastic surgeons in the world. And also this interesting lessor fact in February 2010, the German magazine Focus published a doctoral photo of this Venus giving Europe the middle finger, resulting in a libel suit against journalists and publishing. The Greek court found them not guilty.


What Is Laocoön And His Sons? – Laocoön and His Sons is a sculpture that exemplifies realistic movement. Laocoön and His Sons are frantically attempting to free themselves from the grip of serpents. However, no matter how hard Laocoön and His Sons try, they can’t free themselves from the serpent’s grip. Read more to get the full story and thier outcome.

Modern art is sometimes likened to other art forms difficult to comprehend and seen as garbage. Is Modern Art garbage? Contemporary art is becoming increasingly difficult to interpret because to the departure of conventional trends. When looking at abstract items or lines on a plane, it is difficult to understand what the artist thought. Furthermore, some contemporary artists fool about regularly.


References
Venus de Milo – official page – http://www.venusdemilo.gr/
Very cool 3D model – https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/venus-de-milo-28105f7d4672436bb92831958d6f8471
How to sculpt Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdlzyiDHFnA
Louvre Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zf-Ni5vWZRc
By Livioandronico2013 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54858474
By Photo by mzopw, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43674
By Photo by mzopw, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43671
By Unknown author – Paul Carus: The Venus of Milo: An Archaeological Study of the Goddess of Womanhood. The Open Court Publishing Company, Chicago/London, 1916., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=375078